Front elevation post-restoration showing revealed stonework and reinstated attic dormers
Front elevation post-restoration showing revealed stonework and reinstated attic dormers

Neil Lambert Architect - Architectural services by RIAS, RIBA Chartered Architect covering East Lothian, Edinburgh and South-East Scotland

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View of proposed garden room to rear
View of proposed garden room to rear

Neil Lambert Architect - Architectural services by RIAS, RIBA Chartered Architect covering East Lothian, Edinburgh and South-East Scotland

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South Street, St Andrews

A complex and fascinating project to have been involved with, this saw the restoration, reconfiguration and extension of one of the oldest properties in this ancient Royal Burgh, with parts dating from the 14th century. Notable features included centuries-old vaulted rooms to the ground floor, a rare stone scale-and-platt staircase, a grand bow-fronted Georgian drawing room to the rear and an attic storey containing surviving servants' box beds.

The house had been in use as a dentist's surgery and family home for several generations, and although well loved it had endured less than sympathetic alterations over the decades including outdated 20th-century bathrooms and kitchen, and an ugly coat of grey sand-cement render across the whole front facade. The clients had bought the property with the aim of restoring it to create a unique home for their family.

We carried out a sensitive programme of alterations, retaining as much of the existing fabric as possible while strategically removing elements to open up spaces to suit modern patterns of living. Vaulted rooms were combined and the floor lowered to form a characterful modern kitchen at the heart of the house. An unprepossessing single-storey wing to the rear was replaced with a striking contemporary glazed garden room opening directly onto the mature gardens, with bespoke sliding metal screens to allow climbing plants to colonise the new structure. High-specification new bathrooms were installed throughout, and the hated grey render was carefully removed to reveal a remarkable pattern of stonework telling the story of several centuries of change and development.

The project required close liaison with the local planning authority and conservation officer to gain Listed Building Consent for the alterations, in particular the modern extension and the conjectural restoration of lost attic dormers.

Project with Duncan Low Architect